How Much is a CNA’s Salary?

Becoming a certified nursing assistant may be one of the most complex and tiring yet fulfilling and heart-warming work to do. As an essential member of the health care team, a CNA definitely has a tremendous amount of work to do.

Tasks range from the most basic, such as assisting patients in activities of daily living, to the most complex interventions. Some interventions are only allowed with supervision of registered nurse or licensed practical nurse, such as administering of medications.

Any role helping people conquer illness is rewarding. Along with the fulfillment of aiding others, a CNA’s salary is also the fruit of their labor.

How much is a Certified Nursing Assistant’s Salary?

Before enrolling into a specific program, practical people take into consideration the beginning salary they will earn after certification. Aside from their desire to finish a training program and get a degree, people still want to land a job with a good pay.

After completion, graduates may need to pay back money used for tuition and simultaneously save for their future. To obtain an admirable salary, one must pursue education in his or her chosen field of work to perform well and excel.

According to the Center on Education and the Workforce of Georgetown University (2010), 60% of jobs require a higher education.

People who choose to enroll in accredited training programs to become a CNA make the right choice! The reasons include the following:

ü  An individual does not need to go to an exclusive or an expensive medical school to obtain an honorable job after graduation.

ü  An abundant demand for members of the health care team exists, such as registered nurses and certified nursing assistants, throughout various hospitals and nursing homes. In exchange of this high demand, organizations and institutions offer high salary ranges.

ü  To receive a CNA salary, an individual must attend classes and complete the required training curriculum, score a position as a CNA, and work to the best of his or her ability.

ü  Minimal expense exists when you enroll in an educational program to become a CNA. Depending on the state where you are located, the usual amount of money you can expect to pay is around $300-$400. There is no need to finish in a renowned medical school.

ü  An individual must not forget he or she can enroll in classes to become a CNA without upfront costs because certain institutions are arranging on-the-job CNA training as payment. Particularly, an individual can have on-the-job trainings at local government institutions.

Imagine becoming a professional member of the health care team by certifying through an inexpensive course.

According to Bureau of Labor Statistics, salary of a CNA differs from one state to another. The median salary is $24,010 or $11.54 per hour.

Some location’s vacancies are harder to fill–depending on the demand in the particular location the higher the salary will be and vice versa. In the United States, it is said Alaska offers the highest salary for CNAs–for about $34,800 per year.

Concurrently, the research revealed the lowest salary for CNAs is in Mississippi–offering $19,890 per year. Other states offering above the national average salary for CNAs include Connecticut, Hawaii, Nevada, and New York whereas those the lowest paying states include Alabama, Louisiana and Arkansas.

However, an individual must not forget some organizations determine the pay grade of a CNA based on the level of experience and tenure. CNAs who have the background working as a CNA and more advanced will capture higher pay–approximately $50,000.

CNAs who bear the title as a novice are considered beginners and will impel with a smaller salary–an approximate amount of $22,000 to $29,000. The skills acquired by the CNA while working, such as operating special medical equipment or learning to perform special medical procedure, will determine his or her level of experience.

If a CNA wishes to acquire further professional education by attending seminars for advancement and self-improvement, then he or she deserves a salary increase.

Specific income data is accessible for certain areas of the United States. California for example, offers an average amount of $17,500 to those CNAs with less experience, $18,000 to those with average experience, and $20,000 to those with more experience. In Oklahoma, less experienced CNAs are paid approximately $12,000, average experienced are paid $16,000, while those with significant experience are paid $18,000.

What Other Benefits Can a CNA Get?

It is interesting to know certified nursing assistants will also acquire additional benefits aside from the fixed salary they receive from their hard work. These benefits serve as additional fuel, not just for the health workers but also for the whole workforce in general.

These benefits include the following:

  • Pension
  • Bonus Pay
  • Paid Time or Earned Days Off
  • Sick Leave
  • Tuition Reimbursement
  • Health Care Benefits
  • Tax Benefits

This message is important. A CNA needs to assess the compensation package of the company. At times the compensation package is overlooked when performing a job search. After all, for employees, the compensation is not just the salary but fundamentally how the employee is valued.

It is simple to look at how much a CNA makes per hour. Non-monetary packages include benefits received in a non-tangible value. A benefit package of a certified nursing assistant in a hospital can increase the salary by 30%. Adding the tangible with the compensation package brings the median CNA compensation to a sum of $80,033.

After several months of hard work, the CNA will evoke earnings of a successful person. The CNA must always keep a sound mind in the essence of work not matter what salary is secured. Focusing on patient care and aiming for the improvement of the patient’s quality of life is a principle that should not be lost. Furthermore, CNAs continuously must carry the genuine heart and exhibit the purest intention to support and serve.

More Resources:

http://cew.georgetown.edu/jobs2018/

http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nursing-assistants.htm

http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nursing-assistants.htm#tab-5

http://nature.berkeley.edu/ucce50/ag-labor/7article/article33.htm